Not selected – and a new story.

Sadly, none of the four submissions to ING Discerning Eye appealed to any of the selectors this year. Each of the six invited experts choose their own selection. I like to think that the standard this year was so high that … . Well, it was enjoyable trying. And I combined the mission to collect the barns with a very enjoyable trip to Tate Britain. Several ideas for artists’ barns prompted by that.

And here is the first of the Story Barns. Entitled Story Barn I: Really? In there? When?, the (hopefully obvious) idea is that the piece might stimulate the viewer into devising a story, or stories, of an event, or events, that might have occurred in such a place, perhaps totally imagined or maybe based on an actual experience.

First barn in a planned series of ‘story barns’ – intended to stimulate ideas.
First barn in a planned series of ‘story barns’ – intended to stimulate ideas.

Happy story-telling!

Barns for 2017 ING Discerning Eye exhibition

Yesterday (Sep 2), Julie and I took four of my artists’ barns (well, strictly three, with the fourth being the first in a new series – story barns) for submission to the 2017 ING Discerning Eye exhibition. I managed to have two included in last year’s exhibition. Sadly, neither sold through the exhibition, although one of them, Hergé’s Barn, was sold early this year. (I should add that I was unsuccessful in getting work into the RA Summer Exhibition this year – not even shortlisted.)

I will know during this coming week if any have been selected but it is enjoyable just submitting. The lady who took in the new entries recalled my work from last year – very gratifying. She thought they had sold and was surprised when I told her they hadn’t.

Barn 34: David Hockney’s Barn
Barn 34: David Hockney’s Barn

David Hockney’s Barn is based entirely on his painting, A Bigger Splash. The roof shows the cloudless California sky, one side wall has the windows and their reflections, while just a hint of the ‘splash’ is on the back.

Barn 34: David Hockney’s Barn (reverse)
Barn 34: David Hockney’s Barn (reverse)

Barn 33: Hokusai’s Barn was inspired by our visit a couple of months ago to the Hokusai exhibition at the British Museum. The barn shape came from studying various buildings in his works. The roof colouring is based on his frequent representation of sky, while through the (painted) windows, aspects of his subject matter are suggested.

Barn 33: Hokusai’s Barn
Barn 33: Hokusai’s Barn (end and side)
Barn 33: Hokusai’s Barn (front and side).
Barn 33: Hokusai’s Barn (front and side).

(The idea is that from one side of the barn, the viewer can see Mount Fuji, and from the other side, the viewer sees the ocean, the barn being on land between the two.)

The third of the artists’ barns is Barn 32: Gustav Klimt’s Barn, based on parts of his famous piece, The Kiss. This took quite a lot of working – and reworking – to get right. Laying gold leaf on the door area was a particular challenge.

Gustav Klimt’s Barn
Gustav Klimt’s Barn

The fourth barn submitted will be featured in a following post.